Thursday, December 7, 2017

Book reviews: 'Harry and the Hendersons" and "Wall Street"

In keeping with my 1987 binge...


Pretty rare and somewhat hard to find novelization of the 1987 film starring John Lithgow, Melinda Dillon, and Keven Peter Hall as the big guy underneath Rick Baker's Oscar winning makeup/creature effects.

Although the film was a box office disappointment back in that fabled summer of thirty years ago, the movie, like most Amblin productions from that era, has gone on to acquire a bit of a cult following since. 

Author Joyce Thompson utilizes strong viewpoints in this enjoyable book and really builds upon the characterizations of the movie. She does a nice job capturing the sweetness of the movie and even some of the zany humor. One really nice touch is that she adds a post movie coda for each character, letting us know what they have been up to since the end of the story in the film.

Bottom line: Very enjoyable light read and highly recommended for fans of the movie.





Full disclosure: I am a huge fan of the 1987 Oliver Stone film and of its Oscar winning star Michael Douglas. Oh, and I was in the business for fourteen years. I used to be Bud Fox, sort of. Anyway...

This is another one of those novelizations that I always craved and never even knew existed. And what a treasure it was to find because this a true "novelization", not a retyping of the script in prose form. There is atmosphere, relevant and interesting backstory, and vivid characterizations. These really are the characters from the film, and author Kenneth Lipper fleshes them out in a literary kind of way.

Plus, these book feels authentic and that is because the author is from the business. He knows this world and it shows.

Bottom line: A top notch novelization in every way and a must read for fans of the film.

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Book review: Buck Rogers in the 25th Century: A TV Companion



If you were fifteen years-old in the fall of 1979 (as I was), then "Buck Rogers in the 25th Century" was the greatest television show ever.

Jam-packed with colorful (and often very revealing) costumes, disco-infused sets and music, super cool “Star Wars” style space battles—this sexy prime time space opera featured great villains, two strong leads in Gil Gerard and Erin Gray, enjoyable humor, and a slew of memorable guest stars including Jack Palance, Jamie Lee Curtis, Ann Lockart, Frank Gorshin, and many more. The series also had solid writing thanks to story editors Anne Collins and Alan Brennert.

This exquisitely detailed, beautifully presented behind the scenes book takes the reader right there into the production of the show, beginning with the development of the theatrically released 1979 feature film that was eventually edited into the series pilot episode.

This book by Patrick Jankiewicz (with a forward by Col. Deering herself, Erin Gray) is a fan’s dream come true—an absolute treasure drove of well-organized and insightful behind the scenes information including dozens of modern day interviews with cast members, guest stars, and the crew who made it all happen. Best of all, there is a fully fleshed out, detailed episode guide.

I always wondered what happened to Buck Rogers afte year one. Why, despite being fairly successful in the ratings, the show was completely revamped into an almost unrecognizable form.

After year one, show runner Bruce Lansbury and his talented writers Anne Collins and Alan Brennert left and the network brought in “Gunsmoke” producer John Mantley .

Mantley completely destroyed the Wilma Deering character by changing her from a strong, confident, bad ass leader and making her a meek stewardess (I kid you not). The sexy, witty, exciting show I loved was gone and in season two Buck Rogers became a dour, banal, dull, unimaginative version of “Gunsmoke” in space. This book does a great job of explaining how all of this went down.

Bottom line: One of the best behind the scenes TV “making of” books I have ever read. A must for fans of the show.

Book reviews: 'Quarry's Deal', 'Adventures in Babysitting',



Outstanding classic stylized hard-boiled noir from prolific genre master Max Allan Collins ("The Road to Perdition" and tons of other stuff). 

Quarry is the ultimate two-fisted brooding anti-hero character and Collins gives him a suspenseful, colorful mystery adventure full of femme fatales and shady operators in the tradition of Mickey Spillane, Dashiell Hammett, etc. Collins uses a wonderful, ultra-lean style in this fast-paced crime tale and this book definitely left me hungry to read more Quarry novels.

This novel was first published in 1967 and Hard Case Crimes has done their usual bang-up job in with this beautifully packaged 2016 edition featuring absolutely gorgeous knockout cover art by master illustrator Robert McGinnis.





Thoroughly enjoyable guilty pleasure novelization (based on a screenplay by David Simkins) of the 1987 comedy film that marked the directorial debut of Chris Columbus, the screenwriter of "Gremlins", "The Goonies", and "Young Sherlock Holmes" who would go on to direct many blockbusters including "Home Alone" and the first two "Harry Potter" films.

The movie was a minor sleeper hit and featured a winning performance by Elizabeth Shue. The author Elizabeth Faucher does a good job of capturing the movie's charm and breezy humor and really nails the pop culture vibe and vernacular of the mid/late 1980's. 












Friday, November 24, 2017

Goodreads giveaway for 'Caitlin Star and the Hand of God'

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Caitlin Star and the Hand of God by James J. Caterino

Caitlin Star and the Hand of God

by James J. Caterino

Giveaway ends December 10, 2017.

See the giveaway details at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

She: a novel of obsession, time travel, and film noir




First published in 2005 and recently re-released with new cover art, "She" is a haunting, suspenseful tale about an unsolved murder mystery from the past, an a mysterious woman who appears in the present, and is dead ringer for the long dead victim.

From the back cover:

"We are driving on Street Runs Road now. This is the road—the place where it happened, the birthplace of my journey, the crossroads, the crux of time where the line between life and death merged. It is the place where I was forever changed." 

In July of 1983, JC Pezzini and his parents were involved in a deadly hit-and-run car accident. A mysterious Good Samaritan referred to as “She” was the only reason JC survived—and finding She has become his all-consuming passion in life. More than twenty years later, JC is a filmmaker, a voyeur, and a man haunted by his past. 

With the help of his psychiatrist, his friends, and old acquaintances of the unknown woman, JC will attempt to get closer to She than he could ever hope to—even in his most lucid daydreams. Whether through regression hypnotherapy, time travel by means of an anti-reality chamber, or sheer determination, JC won’t stop until he recovers the answers he has been searching for all these years. 

After coming across a stunning She look-alike named Angela, JC is convinced he’s almost completed his life quest. Only then are the real answers—and the shocking secrets that have hidden the truth—revealed.

Sunday, November 19, 2017

'Caitlin Star and the Hand of God'


Now available in Kindle and on Paperback.

Caitlin Star was once a beaten down but fiery thirteen year-old orphan trained by Gunner Star in the ways of the Bull Mongoni—a mythic species of ancient hominids. Caitlin fought in the Stadium Games and became the leader of a revolution that defeated fascism in the culture civil wars of North America in the days before the apocalypse.

But those days of training, Stadium Games with fights to the death, and revolutions, were a long time ago. Now the Bull Mongoni are not mythic. They are real and living in the Congo rain forest with Caitlin and her human, chimpanzee and gorilla friends. And for the past several years, Caitlin has been less of a warrior and more of a stateswoman as she and her friends have worked hard to build a new world—one of peace where both they and the Earth itself could finally heal from all of the trauma of the past decade.

But across the Atlantic a new evil has been brewing in the tattered remnants of America. An evil that has other plans. An evil being stoked and inspired by an orange-faced ex-TV reality star conman named Mack and his cult leader sidekick Frank Aries, a sadistic religious psychopath who is known as the Hand of God.

“Caitlin Star and the Hand of God” is a smashing, stand-alone sequel to “Caitlin Star: The Trilogy” from neo-pulp master storyteller James J. Caterino.

Saturday, November 4, 2017

Video introduction to 'Caitlin Star and the Hand of God'





Now available in Kindle and on Paperback.

Caitlin Star was once a beaten down but fiery thirteen year-old orphan trained by Gunner Star in the ways of the Bull Mongoni—a mythic species of ancient hominids. Caitlin fought in the Stadium Games and became the leader of a revolution that defeated fascism in the culture civil wars of North America in the days before the apocalypse.

But those days of training, Stadium Games with fights to the death, and revolutions, were a long time ago. Now the Bull Mongoni are not mythic. They are real and living in the Congo rain forest with Caitlin and her human, chimpanzee and gorilla friends. And for the past several years, Caitlin has been less of a warrior and more of a stateswoman as she and her friends have worked hard to build a new world—one of peace where both they and the Earth itself could finally heal from all of the trauma of the past decade.

But across the Atlantic a new evil has been brewing in the tattered remnants of America. An evil that has other plans. An evil being stoked and inspired by an orange-faced ex-TV reality star conman named Mack and his cult leader sidekick Frank Aries, a sadistic religious psychopath who is known as the Hand of God.

“Caitlin Star and the Hand of God” is a smashing, stand-alone sequel to “Caitlin Star: The Trilogy” from neo-pulp master storyteller James J. Caterino.

‘Supergirl’ season 3, episode 4, “The Faithful”


“Supergirl” has been a winning series from the start of its debut back in the fall of 2015, thanks to the charming performance of the effervescent and luminous Melissa Benoist as the title character, a role she was born to play. The show has continued to perform, quietly becoming one the most entertaining and highly enjoyable shows on television.

With its new season, (year 3), the series taken another leap up in quality, something best exemplified by “The Faithful”written by Paula Yoo & Katie Rose Rogers and directed by Jesse Warn. It is the best episode of the show so far and one that also functions beautifully as a stand-alone entry. It asks the fascinating question: What if Supergirl were worshiped as a God by a cult of fanatical followers? And how would Kara/Supergirl handle that?


Guest star Chad Lowe delivers a strong performance as Thomas Colville, a yuppie lawyer who is drowning in cynical despair (and alcohol), and has a seat on the crashing passenger plane that Kara saved back in the pilot episode when she had her coming out as Supergirl. When the plane is safely brought down, Colville stares out the plane window and into the eyes of Kara. His life is transformed forever and a cult leader is born—a cult that worships Supergirl as a God. And a cult that intentionally puts its members and new recruits in grave danger in the belief that Supergirl will show up to save them no matter what.

So much great stuff is going on in this episode. Besides seeing how Kara deals with being the fixation of cult worship, we see her rediscover the roots of her own Krytonian religion. There is also a wonderful “girl talk” scene featuring all of the shows main female characters, including the always fantastic Katie McGrath as Lena Luthor.


The newcomer with a dark secret, Samantha Arias, is a great new addition this season. She is played by the statuesque Odette Annable, someone who has been on my radar since she starred in the 2009 horror gem, “The Unborn”.


The underrated Chyler Leigh to excel, delivering the emotional goods in a very moving storyline about her desire to have children, a desire her fiancé Maggie does not share.

Bottom line: “The Faithful” is an outstanding piece of superhero/science fiction storytelling and the best episode of “Supergirl” yet.

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

'Caitlin Star and the Hand of God', now available


Now available in Kindle and on Paperback.

Caitlin Star was once a beaten down but fiery thirteen year-old orphan trained by Gunner Star in the ways of the Bull Mongoni—a mythic species of ancient hominids. Caitlin fought in the Stadium Games and became the leader of a revolution that defeated fascism in the culture civil wars of North America in the days before the apocalypse.

But those days of training, Stadium Games with fights to the death, and revolutions, were a long time ago. Now the Bull Mongoni are not mythic. They are real and living in the Congo rain forest with Caitlin and her human, chimpanzee and gorilla friends. And for the past several years, Caitlin has been less of a warrior and more of a stateswoman as she and her friends have worked hard to build a new world—one of peace where both they and the Earth itself could finally heal from all of the trauma of the past decade.

But across the Atlantic a new evil has been brewing in the tattered remnants of America. An evil that has other plans. An evil being stoked and inspired by an orange-faced ex-TV reality star conman named Mack and his cult leader sidekick Frank Aries, a sadistic religious psychopath who is known as the Hand of God.

“Caitlin Star and the Hand of God” is a smashing, stand-alone sequel to “Caitlin Star: The Trilogy” from neo-pulp master storyteller James J. Caterino.

Friday, October 13, 2017

The story behind ‘Among the Stars’



“Among the Stars”, the brand new, just published, exciting sexy space opera adventure, is written for the same target audience as all of my work—my thirteen year-old self. In other words, me as I am right now, forever trapped in a perpetual state of exuberant adolescence. 

I write books that I want to read, but nobody else has written. So I am compelled, obsessed, and destined to write them because I desperately need to experience these stories.

The initial creative spark for “Among the Stars” literally comes straight out of my adolescence, because it is based (loosely) on a short story I wrote in circa 1977-78 at the age of thirteen. At the time I was placed into something called the GATE program (that later became the ACE program). It was a “special needs” program according to the state, and in this case the special need was having an I.Q. above 135. Yeah, yeah, well bleep you, because that was a long time ago and whatever capacity I once possessed for higher intelligence has long since vanished.

At any rate, “Among the Stars” was my homage to the science fiction TV shows I had grown up on, mainly classic “Star Trek”, “Space 1999”, and “Lost in Space” (the first season when it was serious, before descending into buffoonery).

“Among the Stars” was my first official work of fiction, (typed out in proper manuscript form by my poor Aunt who had the thankless task of deciphering my handwritten chicken scratch), so I have always wanted to revisit it in some fashion. So in 2015 I was watching film critic Peter Travers interviewing Quentin Tarantino about his then upcoming film “The Hateful Eight”, and Quentin talked about how the inspirations for the film were the endless series of mysterious stranger guest stars who came to town each week on shows like “Gunsmoke”, “Bonanza”, and “The Big Valley”.

That was the spark. Why couldn’t I write my own movie inspired by the TV shows that I grew up on? And I could write the movie as pilot film for a new series (be it film or television). Plus I now had an additional four decades of genre material and forty years of life experience to draw from. Thus, “Among the Stars” version 2017 was born—a wickedly exciting, wildly imaginative new published screenplay that draws inspiration from my love of space opera, pulp fiction, and film noir.


From the back cover:

The year is 2042. The return of fascism, war, and raging climate change have left the Earth on a path toward inevitable destruction. But there is one industry that thrives as people look for an escape—space tourism—lead by Brenda Bakke, the CEO and designer of the Aphrodite, a cruise ship to the stars.

Brenda offers a scholarship ticket to Stanford astrophysicist student Ariana Green, hires Captain Rochelle Blair to helm the Aphrodite’s maiden voyage, and invites former space fighter turned rogue gambler Von Sky to join the ship’s elite stunt team, the Space Angels.

They sail off for Saturn, and the celebrated space cruise is all Brenda could have hoped for, until, sabotage strikes, sending the Aphrodite and its eleven-hundred passengers and crew straight into an anomaly of dark energy where they become—lost "Among the Stars".

Written in the screenplay format, "Among theStars" is the original pilot script for an exciting new science fiction series from the lurid imagination of James J. Caterino, author of "Caitlin Star: The Trilogy" and "Steel Phantom".


This exclusive special edition contains a bonus section of "Among the Stars" concept art from the author’s personal sketchbook.

Friday, October 6, 2017

Caitlin Star: The Trilogy



Part animal. Part legend. All woman. 

Caitlin Star: The Trilogy, is a collection of the first three action-packed books in the controversial Caitlin Star series, collected in one volume for the first time ever. All three books are newly edited and contain brand new, never before read scenes. Also included is a ten page sketchbook of illustrations by the author, all exclusive to this special-edition collection.



Caitlin Star (book 1) 

Gunner Star takes on Caitlin as his protégé and trains her in the ways of the Bull Mongoni, a mythic species of hominids that lived long ago. An exciting, brave new world opens up for Caitlin as she discovers a new philosophy, and begins to see the world around her from a new perspective. This is the origin story you have been waiting for.

Caitlin Star and the Guardian of Forever (book 2)

Caitlin is called into action by Azrael—a.k.a. the Black Knight—a fellow Bull Mongoni warrior with roots in the Congo. Now she must defeat the White Hand, battle the militia of a ruthless Uganda dictator, and face down a mysterious figure who is manipulating everything behind the scenes for a devious purpose that will threaten every living thing on earth.

Caitlin Star and the Rise of the Barbarians (book 3)

Caitlin now lives a life of peace and tranquility deep in the rain forests of the Congo among her ape friends, free from the evil and destructive species known as Homo sapiens. All is well until one day a massive cruise ship shows up on the shore carrying hostile invaders commanded by an old arch enemy of Caitlin’s who will stop at nothing to destroy her and the last remaining paradise on earth.

Caitlin Star: The Trilogy is an addictive, riveting, hard-edged, YA dystopian action adventure that will blow you away and leave you begging for more.

Friday, September 29, 2017

'The Last Neanderthal", the Special Edition




James J. Caterino’s “The Last Neanderthal” has been reformatted and republished with new cover art in a brand new exclusive special edition that includes a bonus short story, the romantic science fiction thriller “The Selfie”.

Often described as “King Kong” meets “Harry and the Hendersons”, “The Last Neanderthal” is a contemporary, emotionally resonant, “Beauty and the Beast” style coming of age adventure story that has been praised for its memorable characters, suspense, action, and heartfelt emotion.


This spectacular new special edition of “The Last Neanderthal” is now available in a glorious 6 x 9 beautifully packaged trade paperback and exclusively on Amazon Kindle Ebooks.





Sunday, September 24, 2017

Sketchbook: Femme Fatales, 'The Last Neanderthal', and 'Among the Stars'


Sketch of sensational supermodel Elizabeth Turner.






WIP painting of a femme fatale inspired by an old picture of a pre-Buck Rogers Erin Gray.



Painting of the cover art for the published screenplay "Among the Stars".







Concept sketch of a scene with Kronos and Ella in "The Last Neanderthal".


Wednesday, September 20, 2017

My top ten favorite writers of all time

A regular reader of these pages and self-described “Caitlin Star” fan Gene Atkins wrote, “I have been digging your top ten series so far, but was wondering if you could do a list of your top writers of all time?”

Gene has a good point. I have done top ten lists of movies, TV shows, soundtracks, actors, actresses, books, even songs, and have yet to make an official top ten list of writers. And since I am a writer, it is time to correct this oversight. So here it is, a list of my top ten favorite writers of all time. All genres, media, and formats are included.




Robert Silverberg

There is a wonderful article written by Silverberg in the outstanding pulp retrospective book “Sin-O-Rama” where he talks about cranking out a new 50,000 word erotic pulp novel—every two weeks! And you know what? I have read many of them and they are damn good reads.

How good is Silverberg? One of my favorite books ever was this scanner-type science fiction romantic thriller I picked up in the ‘70s. It was a reprint and when he was asked to write a new forward Silverberg confessed it was something he had cranked out just to pay the bills and had forgotten about it. This novel would have been anyone else’s masterpiece, but for him it was just something spit out to pay the heating bill and forgotten about.

Of course, nobody but me even remembers any of these old pulps and today Robert Silverberg is best known for his artful, poetic prose and award-winning, intelligent science fiction and fantasy novels.
"The World Inside" is highly recommended for fans of the recent best-seller "Divergent".

What to check out:

“Lord Valentine’s Castle” and “The World Inside”









Joan Ellis

I am a huge fan of vintage pulp fiction from the early and mid ‘60s known as “the sleazy pulps”, especially those published by a company called Midwood. Most stories were set in Manhattan and have a very “Mad Men” quality to them. Often the characters even worked in advertising.


Joan Ellis was the all-time best at this sub-genre of fiction. Do not let the term sleazy pulps fool you. Her books are rich, expertly crafted, romantic, noir-ish works of wonder. Ellis has a real knack for creating vivid, young female characters dealing with teen angst and blossoming sexuality. Today these books would be called racy “Young Adult”.

What to check out:

Just about anything she wrote at Midwood Publishing. Personal favorites include “In The Shadows” (actually available on Kindle!), “Sooner or Later”, “Gang Girl”, and "Reluctant Nympho".






John Jakes

John Jakes may be the best writer of epic historical fiction ever—certainly of American history. There are many writers—and many of them quite successful—where you can feel the strain of the work the author put into it. As a result these books often do not make for a smooth read. In a John Jakes novel this is never an issue. He is just a gifted storyteller and a natural writer who delivers impeccable craftsmanship and flowing narratives you will get lost in. Most of his historical fiction is truly epic in scope and length—I am talking telephone book thick door stopper novels. Yet, they read fast and smooth.



Like Robert Silverberg, Jakes started out in pulp fiction doing everything from sleazy romance to science fiction to a “Conan” inspired Sword & Sorcery series, “Brak the Barbarian”. All of it is great!

What to check out:

“The Bastard”, “North and South”, and his novelization to “Conquest of the Planet of the Apes”.





Robert E. Howard

I recall Harlan Ellison once saying something like, “Howard was better than any of us because he was crazier than a bedbug.”

There is a raw physicality to Howard’s writing style and colorful action sequences that was ingeniously captured by the legendary cover paintings of Frank Frazetta. Although his “Conan” stories are classified as Sword & Sorcery (Howard practically created the genre), Howard creates real, naturalistic worlds and writes stories that feel like they may have actually happened sometime during the mythical lost history “between the years the ocean drank Atlantis and the gleaming cities…”


What to check out:

Almost any “Conan” book (or comic book) but the best collection (because it is contains the fully restored and unedited text of Howard) is “The Coming of Conan the Cimmerian” (Conan the Cimmerian #1), as well as part 2 and 3 of this collection.





Harlan Ellison

Speaking of Harlan Ellison…

Harlan Ellison is a writer. And I mean that term in the most profound, artistic sense of the word. Very few authors are writers, nor can they ever hope to be. I know I am not. I am a storyteller, a confident (and hopefully competent) one who strives to get better and deeper and more effective with every piece of work. But Harlan Ellison is a writer. His words sing and soar and shake you to the core and along the way he will tell you one hell of a story.


What to check out:

This list would take forever because Ellison is as prolific as he is brilliant, and has written everything imaginable including scores of television scripts, comics, and sleazy sex pulps and hundreds upon hundreds of short stories.

A good place to start world be his short story collection, “Trouble Makers”, which includes two of the greatest, “‘Repent, Harlequin!’ Said the Ticktockman” and “Deeper Than the Darkness.”
“Honorable Whoredom at a Penny a Word” is a glorious collection of his early crime/pulp/noir stuff. And his two classic “Outer Limits” episodes “Demon with a Glass Hand” and “Soldier” are a must see and are available streaming at Hulu and Amazon.





Richard Matheson

Like Harlan Ellison, this guy is the real deal. Richard Matheson is a writer! And one hell of a storyteller too. Also like Ellison, he was wildly prolific, but on an even bigger scale in a sense since his focus was primarily novels (as well as countless feature film screenplays and television scripts).

His influence and imprint are perhaps unequaled among the grand masters of science fiction, fantasy, and horror. He literally created both the modern zombie and vampire apocalypse genres with his 1954 classic novel “I am Legend”. His 1975 time travel fantasy masterpiece “Bid Time Return” was adapted into the beloved 1980 cult film “Somewhere in Time”, one of the most heartfelt and romantic movies of all time.


He penned multiple classic “Twilight Zone” episodes, many classic 70s horror telefilms including “Kolchak the Night Stalker” and “Trilogy of Terror”, and wrote “Duel”, the 1971 television movie that propelled a very young Steven Spielberg onto big screen stardom.  Among his many masterpieces are the action-packed nightmare adventure “The Shrinking Man”, the creepy “Stir of Echoes” (made into a 1999 film starring Kevin Bacon), and the deep and moving “What Dreams May Come” (made into a gorgeous looking 1998 movie starring Robin Williams).


Where to start:

“The Shrinking Man” and “Bid Time Return” showcase the action suspense, and the romantic imagination of this master writer.





D.C. Fontana

Okay, I know this one will be unfamiliar to most people. D.C. Fontana (a.k.a Dorothy Fontana) is a television writer who started out as Gene Roddenberry’s secretary then went on to write several of the greatest episodes of classic “Star Trek”. 

She served as story editor for “Star Trek” and several other shows including the Emmy Award winning animated “Star Trek”, “The Sixth Sense”, “The Fantastic Journey” and “Logan’s Run”. The list of outstanding episodes she penned over the last five decades are too numerous to list here but include scripts for “Circle of Fear”, “Land of the Lost”, “The Six Million Dollar Man”, “Kung Fu”, “Buck Rogers in the 25th Century”, “Star Trek: The Nest Generation”, “Babylon 5”, “Deep Space Nine”, and “Earth: The Final Conflict”.


What to check out:

“This Side of Paradise” and “The Enterprise Incident” from classic “Star Trek”.
“Eslewhen” from “Land of the Lost”.





Glen Morgan and James Wong

It is staggering how many outstanding television scripts this writing team delivered in the ‘90s, including the majority of the best stuff from Chis Carter’s brooding tandem of “The X-Files” and “Millennium”.

Everything these guys write is exciting, witty, imaginative, and more often than not, groundbreaking.  In addition to their work for Carter, the duo created, produced, and wrote their own series—a barely seen gem of a show “Space Above and Beyond”.  “Space Above and Beyond” was an addictive, beautifully produced, intelligently written and acted show that should have become the “Battlestar Galactica” of the ‘90’s, but was poorly handled by FOX who kept pre-empting it and barely bothered with any promotion.


What to checkout:

“Space Above and Beyond” and the “X-Files” episodes “Home”, “Ice”, “E.B.E.”, “Squeeze”, “Little Green Men”, “The Field Where I Died” and “Musings of a Cigarette Smoking Man”. Also just about the entire second season of “Millenium”.




James Cameron
He is primarily known as a visionary director who creates revolutionary new technology to bring his vision to the screen. But all of those movies begin with a blank page. James Cameron writes all his own material and he is one hell of writer.

When I was studying screenwriting I read his scripts for “Rambo: First Blood part II”, “Aliens”, and “The Abyss” non-stop. His story-telling instincts are razor sharp, his expertly paced screenplays rich with vivid writing and memorable characters.


What to check out:

Anything with his name on it of course, but from a reading the screenplay point of view, “Aliens” and “The Abyss” read like great science fiction action-adventure novels.





Edgar Rice Burroughs

When your work is still being read, adapted, and inspiring other artists over a century later, that about says it all. The works of ERB had a profound influence on so many, from anthropologist Jane Goodall to filmmaker James Cameron (the director has said “Avatar” was inspired by “Princess of Mars”).

When read today, sometimes the language can be problematic, as can the “God’s eye” omniscient writing style in vogue at the time. But still, Burrough’s rich, imaginative storytelling skills are unparalleled in the world of pulp fiction and his works are full of bold action, riveting action set pieces, and wondrous lost cities.


Where to start:

Book 3 in the Tarzan series “The Beasts of Tarzan” is the best in the entire series and one my all-time favorite books. “Princess of Mars” is an outstanding entry into ERB universe and the sub-genre of “planetary romance”.